FHF Gear Bino Harness Review

I've had the FHF Bino Harness from FHF Gear for a couple of years now.  I've used it extensively for hunting and scouting, and while I was planning on posting a review as part of a more extensive binocular harness review, I haven't gotten to that yet, but figured the FHF Gear Bino Harness is worthy of its own review.
I've tried or owned multiple bino harnesses out there, from the basic Crooked Horn bino harness to Badlands revolutionary magnetic closure bino harness.  I've always liked a harness setup over a neck strap, and like the idea of keeping my binos somewhat protected from the elements (weather and dust), even if it does mean a slightly slower amount of time to get my binoculars into play.  After searching for a bino harness I liked, I even put together a semi-custom bino harness out of a Crooked Horn bino cover and an old IPI bino harness.  

I use Leica Geovid range finding binoculars in 8x42.  I really like these binoculars, but they are pretty big and somewhat heavy.  When I first contacted Paul at FHF Gear and gave him my binocular dimensions for him to make me a binocular harness, he thought his standard size 'case' would work, but after taking one of his pre-made harnesses and trying my binos in it, realized he'd need to upsize it some for my monster binos.  I also had him make one of the side pouches slightly larger for being able to fit in a larger elk call.  That is one of the best aspects of this bino harness, is that custom options are available (at a cost / time delay).  (I believe now Paul has 3 different sizes available, small (6" tall), medium (6.75" tall), and large (7.5" tall))

My bino case is made out of  heavy weight cordura nylon.  It is very sturdy and has withstood a couple of years of use.  The harness itself is non-elastic webbing, that holds snug to your body and doesn't bounce.  The harness has been very comfortable under a backpack, with no spots that have bugged me.  It adjusts quickly and easily should you need to loosen it or tighten it based off the amount of clothing being worn.  

Here are some pictures of the harness.


The bino harness isn't sealed, so dust can get in.  However, with the flap covering the binoculars, they are protected from light weather.  There are small front pockets on the harness that hold tags, mouth calls, or other small items.  The top flap is secured with a shock corded closure that is easily opened and closed with one hand.  The top flap slides behind the binoculars for when you need immediate access to your binoculars (see above picture).  There are 2 straps that connect to your binoculars and are attached to the harness that keep the binos attached to the harness.  (Note: I replaced the standard connectors that attach the binos to the harness with connectors I took off a camera case strap.)  The back of the bino harness contains a mesh panel that helps in breath ability against your chest.  

I've used this harness while scouting, archery hunting, and rifle hunting.  I really like how it holds my binoculars securely against my chest, but allows quick and quiet access to my binoculars.  About the only negatives to this harness is that it isn't 'sealed' against dust, the loudness of the inside fabric, and possibly the loudness of the cordura outer fabric.  The binoculars make some noise when being inserted and removed, and I've noticed a couple of times while crawling in closer to animals that weeds and brush scratch against the cordura outer material.  While archery hunting, I do tend to switch back and forth between this harness and my semi custom harness that is quieter, but has a couple of imperfections that I tire of dealing with.  However, the comfort, ease of access, and reliability of the FHF Gear harness out weighs the minor negatives in my mind.  

Here are some pictures of the bino harness in action.











Comments

  1. Thanks for reviewing this binoculars..what is best binoculars for startgazing...

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